Health Benefits of Knitting

With the winter months slowing creeping in it’s time to take up some in door hobbies. One which is becoming very popular with those old and young is knitting. From hats, to scarves, blankets to jumpers, there are so many things you can knit!

Here are some of the top health benefits that knitting brings!

 

1.       Improving your concentration

Whatever your age, knitting is known to help those who have trouble focusing on one thing for long periods of time. It gives you something to focus on by shifting your attention to the present moment.  In addition, as you see your progress instantly with what you’re making, your desire to concentrate is reinforced on the project you wish to complete.

2       Improves good habits

Knitting is the perfect way of keeping busy, especially when you can get bored easily. It is the perfect hobby to take up as it has no negative effects to your physical or mental health and doesn’t interfere with your daily life. Choosing to knit is a conscious decision with subconscious benefits because of the level of concentration required to finish off whatever you are knitting.

3.        Helps memory

To knit the perfect items takes a lot of dedication and practice to develop the perfect skills to help you in your future knitting projects. Therefore, the trial and error aspect of knitting teaches you to remember errors made previously to avoid them in the future.

4.        Building relationships

Even though knitting can be a solitary task there are many local groups, which you can join that are full of fellow knitters like you. Therefore, it will help you to make new friends who have similar interest s, which will help with your mental health wellbeing.

5.        Help Improve on stress, depression and anxiety

The rhythmic actions of knitting can help distract you from the symptoms of anxiety, stress and depression. Sitting still and knitting reduces your heart rate as it’s a relaxing experience so whenever you start to feel anxious or stress and  reach for those knitting needles to help calm you down.

 

6.        Help to prevent arthritis and tendinitis

Knitting isn’t just good for your mental health but your physical heath too. As knitting involves using your fingers it helps to build up cartilage, making them stronger instead of the cartilage wearing down. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holiday Packing Tips

Along with the sun cream and beach towels you need to decide what your holiday wardrobe must contain. From shoes to shirts, shorts to lightweight trousers packing your holiday suitcase can be a nightmare! Don’t worry though Chums is here to help you decide what’s best to take away on your long awaited vacation.

For him

Tops

Make sure you pick tops, T-shirts and polo’s, which you will feel comfortable in throughout your sunny holiday.   Why not take a look at our Pegasus classic polo shirt, great for keeping you cool on those sunny days.  Coming in 9 different colours you can get one for each day of your holiday! Everyone needs a good pair of shorts when they go away, whether you’re on a city holiday or a beach break the perfect pair of shorts are key to looking and feeling great! Why not try our chino shorts, perfect for dressing up or down, or our stain resistant shorts the perfect cover for the day.

 

Shorts

Everyone needs a good pair of shorts when they go away, whether you’re on a city holiday or a beach break the perfect pair of shorts are key to looking and feeling great! Why not try our chino shorts, perfect for dressing up or down, or our stain resistant shorts the perfect cover for the day.

 

Trousers

A pair of chinos are a staple for the holiday season, pair with a smart shirt for the evening times for that evening meal with your family, or add a polo shirt for that sightseeing trip.

 

 

Shoes

Don’t forget your feet while on vacation, with the sunny weather you need to make sure your feet look and feel great. A pair of sandals in the day are ideal or those walks along the beach or a adventure into town.  If you’re looking for that perfect smart shoe for the evening time try our cushion walk boat shoe for that extra comfort.

 

 

Timeless Trends

Introduction

Fashion conscious across the globe are always all looking for the next best trend, trawling through magazines and following fashion weeks to catch a glimpse of the upcoming trends to ensure their look is always on top. But, have you ever thrown your favourite item of clothing away, only for it to come back in fashion a few years later? You’re not alone! We’ve taken a look back at fashion through the ages, and the timeless trends that never go out of style.

Fashion through the ages

1920s –

The Flapper Girl  

Known as the roaring twenties, the 1920s fashion trends are more commonly associated with the ‘flapper girl’ fashion. Throughout these years, women wore dresses all day, every day, through rain and shine.

1920s dresses were sleeveless, shapeless, ankle to knee length slip gowns accented with beading, sequins, fringe and feathers. Rich pastel tones and jewels made any gown expensive and most were matched with headbands, shawls, long pearl necklaces and arm bangles.

1950s –

The ‘New Look’

The ‘New Look’ trend was introduced by Christian Dior in 1947. The look celebrated the end of the war and gave women the opportunity to put some fun back into their wardrobe, the look itself focused on an hourglass figure, shoulders were soft not squared while fabrics and petticoats were used to create bountiful, calf-length skirts.

The Pencil Skirt

Another popular look of the fifties included the high-waisted pencil skirt, known for its sleek and slender look this suited those who didn’t follow the ‘New Look’ trend and is still a favourite today. Both looks incorporated delicate prints and patterns and were accompanied by the ever-popular ‘pin-curl’ hairstyle. This look can be seen on women today, who still replicate the 1950s look.

The Mini Skirt

The 1960s also known as the swinging sixties saw the debut of the ever-loved miniskirt, revolutionary to the women’s fashion scene, this design saw for the first time, hemlines being taken over the knee. The timeless trend has evolved over the years and is seen in many season collections today.

The Little Black Dress

Known and adored globally, the LBD (little black dress) is better recognised for its appearance in the 1961 film, Breakfast at Tiffany’s worn by Audrey Hepburn. The sleek, flattering and sophisticated style ensures that this ultimate classic trend will maintain its popular status for decades to come.

1970s –

Flares and platforms

The days of Cher and ABBA, were epitomised by two trends, flares and platform boots. Although flares were first introduced towards the end of the 60s they hit their peak in the 70s, with the trend continuing to fall in and out of the fashion scene.

The high-waisted flares were more commonly paired with platform boots, a trend that has been seen in very recent autumn/winter collections for a host of popular brands.

 

1980s –

Shoulder Pads

Whether you were a fan or not, the decade-defining shoulder-pads were a huge fashion trend in the 80s, used to create the illusion of a broader shoulder line, women indulged in this trend in all different styles of tops and jackets.

1990s –

Double Denim

From Justin and Britney to Bwitched, the 90s saw the trend of the double denim come to fruition. The pairing of denim shorts or jeans with a denim jacket to match. The look wasn’t for everyone; however, it has found its way back into our shops today and is adored by celebrities and adolescents alike.

The Pleated Plaid Skirt

The 90s also bought with it a fan favourite, the pleated plaid skirt, famously worn by Alicia Silverstone on the 1995 film Clueless and a favourite of Jennifer Anniston on her run in F.R.I.E.N.D.S the pleated plaid mini skirt was usually paired with knee-high socks and a polar neck jumper. Another timeless trend that is still seen in many collections today.

2000 –

Boho-Chic

The noughties saw Boho-chic, a look not too dissimilar to the hipsters of the 70s, this style saw women wearing floaty skirts paired with textured gilets and wide belts. The Boohoo look is still popular today with spring/summer catwalks still including those long floating items perfect for a summer getaway. 

 

 

 

Return Of The Cords

Fashion is one big circle. Trends come into fashion, then go out of fashion, only to come back in twenty years later. Corduroy trousers have finally become popular again after almost two decades of being considered ugly and unstylish. Here we look at the corduroy trousers in more detail from their inception, to today.

#CorduroyComeback

The early years

Previously known as ‘Fustian’, the manufactured textile was originally produced in Fustat, Egypt circa 200 AD. In the 12th Century, Fustian became increasingly popular, and with the growth of the cotton trade, distribution throughout Europe began.

Imitations of fustian textiles were common, and by the end of 16th Century, fustians were being manufactured in London, Lancashire and Ireland.

Fast Forward to the 18th Century and the fabric was being manufactured as a practical, outdoor fabric thanks to its durability and warmth. A more expensive, longer brushed pile known as Naples Fustian was worn by the elite. Servants livery was also commonly manufactured from a cheaper version of the material.

By the end of the 18th Century, fustian became known as ‘cotton velvet’ or ‘corduroy’ as we now know it.

Why is it called corduroy?

The word ‘corduroy’ derives from the French ‘corde du roi’, meaning cloth of the king.

In the 17th Century, French royal servants wore a durable fustian-style fabric. The word corduroy was coined around the late 18th Century

Did you know? The Oxford English Dictionary cites 1774 as the earliest date of use of the word ‘corduroy’.

The 20th Century

Corduroy became a popular fabric for school uniforms in the early 1900s. It’s also popular for sporting and military wear—used for soldiers’ trousers in WWI throughout Europe.

Did you know? In 1918, Henry Ford chose a hard wearing corduroy for the interior of his Ford Model T.

Through the 1920s and 30s corduroy continues to be popular, not only for sporting and military wear, but also for suits, caps and jackets. The versatility of the fabric lent itself to the fashion of that time—workwear and active.

By the 1950s, cords had gone out of fashion several times. It was often mocked as old-fashioned and out of date, worn by pipe smoking college professors. Each time it went out of fashion, it returned with a refreshed look.

In 1982, popular fashion designer Gianni Versace introduced a whole line of corduroy clothing.